Carmen Libretto

Georges Bizet

Act I

Act II

Act

ACTE PREMIER (ACT ONE)
Prelude
 

English

A square in Seville. On the right, the door of a tobacco factory. At the back of the stage there is a bridge which can be crossed, spanning the whole width of the stage. Access to the bridge from the stage is by a curved staircase, which curves to the right above the tobacco factory door. There is an entrance from under the bridge. On the left, in the foreground, is a guardhouse.  In front of the guardhouse there is a little covered balcony, with two or three steps up to it. In a rack, near the guardhouse, are the dragoons' lances with their red and yellow pennants. When the curtain rises we see about fifteen soldiers (dragoons of the Alcala regiment) grouped in front of the guardhouse. Some sit smoking, others lean on the balustrade. Passers-by in the square -- people in a hurry, people on business, come and go, meet, greet, or jostle each other, etc.
 

SCÈNE PREMIERE (SCENE I)

Morales, Micaela, Soldiers, Passers-by
 
CHORUS OF DRAGOONS
All around here,
People wander,
People come, people go;
Odd lot of folk these people are!
MORALES 
We stand round in the Guardroom doorway,
Hoping time will fly,
Smoking, gossiping, while oberving
Passers-by pass by.
CHORUS
All around here, etc.
(After a few minutes Micaela enters, wearing a blue skirt, with plaints to her shoulders. Shy and embarrassed, she watches the soldiers, comes forward, moves away again, etc.)
MORALES
(to the soldiers)
Well here is someone rather sweeter
Who seems to have something to say,
She has! You see, she's turning, we should meet her ....
CHORUS
We ought to help, and right away!
MORALES 
(to Micaela, gallantly)
Who do you want, my charmer?
MICAELA 
(with simplicity)
Me? a corporal of dragoons.
MORALES
(emphatically)
Here your are,
That's me!
MICAELA
The corporal I have come to see is called
Don José ... Do you now him too?
MORALES
Don Jose? Oh yes, of course we do.
MICAELA
(animatedly)
You do? Then tell me is he now with you here?
MORALES
(elegantly)
He never was a corporal in our platoon, dear.
MICAELA 
(with disappointment)
And so, he's not in there?
MORALES
No, dearest charmer, he's not in there;
But very soon he will be here.
He will be here the moment that the new guard
Relieves the guard that's due to go off duty.
ALL
He will be here the moment that the new guard
Relieves the guard that's due to go off duty.
MORALES
(very gallantly)
While you wait for his arrival,
Would you care, my lovely child,
Would you care to take the trouble,
To step inside here awhile?
MICAELA
With you?
CHORUS
With us!
MICAELA
(slyly)
Oh no! No, no,
Many thanks, kind sirs, even so.
MORALES
Step inside, dear, don't be frightened,
For I promise while you're there,
We will show, towards your person,
The great respect you inspire.
MICAELA
I am sure you will, all the same,
I shall return, that will be best, I'll try again!
(She laughs as she repeats Morales's phrase.)
I shall return the moment that the new guard 
Relieves the guard that's due to go off duty.
SOLDIERS
Stay here until the moment that the new guard
Relieves the guard that's due to go off duty.
(The soldiers surround Micaela.)
Oh, you must stay!
MICAELA
(She tries to evade them.)
No, no, I can't!
SOLDIERS
Oh, you must stay!
MICAELA
No, no, I can't!
No, no! Goodbye,
Kind sirs.
(She escapes and runs off.)
MORALES 
The bird has flown,
We're left alone!
Once again we'll have to try
Observing passers-by pass by!
CHORUS
All around here,
People wander, etc.
Bugles and fifes can be heard very faintly in the distance, playing a military march. The new guard is arriving. The officer comes out of the guardhouse. A bugle call on stage. The soldiers go to take their lances and line up in front of the guardhouse. The passers-by form a group on the right to watch the changing of the guard. The sound of the military march comes nearer and nearer ... The new guard finally enters from the left and crosses the bridge. First two fifes and a bugle. Then a troop of little urchins taking very long steps to keep pace with the dragoons -- the children should be as small as possible. Lieutenant Zuniga and Corporal Don José behind the children, then the dragoons with their lances. 

 SCÈNE II (SCENE II)

The above, Don José, Lieutenant Zuniga
 
No. 2. March and Chorus of Urchins
 
CHILDREN
With the guard that comes on duty
We are marching, here we are!
Sound trumpet, sound very loudly!
Ta ra ta ta, ta ra ta ta.
We are proper little soldiers,
Heads well up we march along,
We keep in step with the music,
Left! Right! We're never wrong. (shouted)
Shoulders well back when we're marching,
Chest well out, we're on parade,
Arms held, like this, from the shoulder,
With the fingers down the side.
With the guard that comes on duty
We are marching. Here we are!
Sound trumpet, sound very loudly!
Ta ra ta ta, ta ra ta ta.
ZUNIGA
(spoken over the last bars of the chorus)
Halt! At ease!
The new guard lines up on the right, facing the old guard. As soon as the urchins, who have stopped on the right in front of the curious onlookers, stop singing, the officers salute with their swords and begin to speak in low voices. Sentries are changed.

  SCÈNE III (SCENE III)

Dialogue
 
ZUNIGA
Tell me, corporal?
JOSÉ
(rising)
Yes, lieutenant.
ZUNIGA
And do women work there? ...
JOSÉ
Yes, sir.
ZUNIGA
And are they pretty?
DON JOSÉ
(laughing)
I suppose so ...
ZUNIGA
Oh, come on!
DON JOSÉ
What do you expect? ... these Andalusian girls frighten me ... never a word of sense ...
ZUNIGA
Besides, we have a weakness for blue skirts and plaits to the shoulders.
JOSÉ
That's the costume of Navarre ... it reminds me of home ...
ZUNIGA
So you're from Navarre?
DON JOSÉ
Yes, sir. Don José Lizzarabengoa is my name.
ZUNIGA
Lizzarabengoa ... Oh, it was you who killed ...
DON JOSÉ
No, it wasn't like that ... a lad from Alava picked a quarrel with me ... it wasn't my intention ... I had to leave home ... I became a soldier.
ZUNIGA
Aha! Now I understand why ...
The factory bell rings.
DON JOSÉ
There goes the factory bell, sir. Now you can judge for yourself ... 

  SCÈNE IV (SCENE IV)

Don José, Soldiers, Young Men and Cigarette Girls
 
The square begins to fill with young men who come and stand where the girls will pass.  The soldiers come out of the Guard house.   Don José sits down busying himself with repairing the
chain of his saber and pays no attention to the young men and the townspeople entering.
 
N.3. Choeur et Scène (N.3. Chorus and Scene)
"Voici la cloche qui sonne...La cloche a sonné"
YOUNG MEN
There's the factory bell, so we take our places,
Lying here in wait till the girls arrive;
Then we follow you, dusky little beauties,
Murmuring in your ear tender words of love!
The cigarette girls appear, cigarettes between their lips. They come under the bridge and slowly onto the stage.
SOLDIERS
There they are! With gaze unashamed,
Looks so provoking!
Cigarettes between their red lips,
Lazily smoking!
CIGARETTE GIRLS
Smoke rings make their lazy way,
Softly curling,
Softly curling,
Skyward they stray,
In a fragrant cloud unfurling.
Their perfume pervades the air,
Gently stealing,
Gently stealing,
Soothing our mind
To a mellow pleasant feeling.
Those tender words you lovers say
every day
Fade away!
Your promises, too, like the smoke
in the blue,
Fade away.
Smoke rings rise and float away
In the blue of the sky.
See them curling and rising
And vanish at last in the blue of the sky.
See them rise,
To the skies!
YOUNG MEN
(to the cigarette girls)
Do not be so cruel, 
And listen to us, you beauties,
You whom we adore,
Whom we idolize.
CIGARETTE GIRLS
(laughing)
Those loving words in your ear
And their passion and their vows here
All will vanish
As the smoke does.
Our eyes slowly follow the smoke
As it curls, as it floats
To the sky
Ever higher!
The same, Carmen
 
SOLDIERS
But we have not yet seen our Carmencita.
CHORUS
Here she comes!
She is here!
Here is our Carmencita!
Enter Carmen. Her costume and manner of entering are exactly as Mérimée described. She wears a bunch of acacia flowers in her corsage and holds a single bloom at the corner of her mouth. Three or four young men enter with her. They follow her, surround her and talk to her. She flirts and chatters with them. Don José looks up. He looks at Carmen, then returns to working quietly on his chain.
 
YOUNG MEN 
(entering with Carmen)
At last! Like your shadow we follow you!
Carmen! Oh be kind and answer us do!
And tell us which day to hope for your love!
CARMEN
(gaily, looking at them)
When I'll give you my love? Who knows, it's hard to tell ...
Perhaps not at all, tmorrow maybe!
(resolutely)
But one thing I'll say: Not today.
N.4. Havanaise (No. 4. Habanera)
"L' amour est un oiseau rebelle"
CARMEN
Love's a bird that will live in freedom,
That no man ever learned to tame
And in vain men may call and call her
If she's no mind to play their game!
They'll find nothing they do will tempt her,
The one tries charm, the other's dumb!
And that other's the one I fancy,
He may not talk, but he's the one!

Oh love was born to gipsy life,
A life that's free, that is as free as air;
You may not love me, yet I love you,
But if I love you, then you take care!

But this bird that you thought you'd taken
Has flapped her wings and flown away;
When love's gone then you sit there waiting,
You give up waiting, down she'll fly!
All around you she'll fly so quickly,
She's there, she's gone, she's back in view,
Think you've caught her and she'll escape you,
Think you've escaped and she's caught you!

Oh love was born to gipsy life,
A life that's free, that is as free as air,
You may not love me, yet I love you;
But if I love you, then you take care!

YOUNG MEN 
Carmen! Like your shadow we follow you!
Carmen! Oh be kind and answer us do!
The young men surround Carmen. She looks at them one after the other, leaves the circle they have formed around her, and then  goes straight up to Don José, who is still busying himself with the chain for his priming pin. She takes an acacia flower from her corsage and thows it at Don José.
 
CIGARETTE GIRLS (enter laughing)
Oh love was born to gipsy life,
A life that's free, that is as free as air,
You may not love me, yet I love you;
But if I love you, then you take care!

 SCÈNE VI (SCENE VI)

Carmen goes into the factory. The young men leave to the right and the left. The lieutenant, who had been chatting with some factory girls during the scene, leaves them and follows the soldiers into the guardhouse. Don José remains alone.
Micaela enters.
 

 SCÈNE VII SCENE VII
"Monsieur le brigadier?" No 6 Duo: "Parle-moi de ma mère!"

Don José, Micaëla
 
MICAËLA
Señor Corporal?
DON JOSÉ
(hurriedly hiding the acacia flower)
What? ... What's that? ... Micaëla! ... it's you ...
 
MICAËLA
It's me! ... Your mother sent me ...
N. 6. Duet
DON JOSÉ (moved)
Oh tell me all about her!
Oh tell me all about her!
MICAËLA (simply)
I've come instead of her, with something that she gave me;
Here's a letter.
DON JOSÉ (delighted)
A letter!
MICAËLA
And here's some money too ...
(She gives him a small purse.)
To help you out a little with your pay ...
And then ...
DON JOSÉ
And then? ...
MICAËLA
And then ... Oh, no, I dare not,
And then ... there's something else I bring you
Worth more than all your pay, and which for any son
Will have a value all its own.
DON JOSÉ
This other something, you must tell me
What it is ...
MICAËLA
Yes, I'll tell you now.
What I received from her I now will give to you.
As we both were returning home from church this morning,
Taking my arm gently in hers:
"Now go," your mother said, "to the town; 
It isn't very far there, and when you reach Sevilla,
You look for my dear son, my José, my own boy!
Say his mother never forgets him,
Has him night and day in her mind ...
Though he did wrong, yet she forgives him,
And that she hopes that he'll return.
All I've said now be sure you tell him,
Just as though I were there to see;
And then the kiss that I give you now,
With my love give to him from me."
DON JOSÉ (very moved)
Then it's true she forgives me!
MICAËLA
And she sends you a kiss.
José, I give it you as she then gave it to me.
Micaela stands on tiptoe and gives José an unselfconsciously maternal kiss. Don José, very moved, lets her kiss him.
DON JOSÉ (very moved)
She's there before my eyes! ... And there's the village I remember!
Oh happy days now gone by! Oh land that I held so dear!
You fill my heart with strength and give me courage.
Oh memory so dear,
My mother standing there, that village I remember.
She's there before my eyes ...
(etc.)
MICAËLA
She's there before his eyes ...
(etc.)
DON JOSÉ
(to himself, looking towards the factory)
Who knows of what demon I should have been the prey!
(pulling himself together)
Even from far my Mother breaks the charm
(impulsively)
And by the kiss that she has sent me
She drives the danger off and keeps her son from harm!
MICAËLA (straightfowardly)
But what demon and what harm? I do not understand ...
Tell me what do you mean?
DON JOSÉ
Nothing! Nothing!
Let's talk of you, dear Micaela;
So will you be back there today?
MICAËLA
Yes, by this evening ... I'll see your mother in the morning.
DON JOSÉ (eagerly)
Well when you do, remember ... Tell her from me
How much I love her and revere her,
How true my repentance today.
I'd like her, though we are parted,
To be proud of her boy!
All I've said now be sure you tell her,
Just as though she were here to see!
And then the kiss that I give you now,
With my love give to her from me!
(He kisses her.)
MICAËLA (simply)
I promise that I will ... and with love from her son,
José, I'll give it to her as you would like it done.
Reprise of Duet.
 
Dialogue
 
DON JOSÉ
Wait a moment ... I'll read her letter ...
 
MICAËLA (interrupting him)
I'd better go ...
DON JOSÉ
Micaëla!
MICAËLA
No, no ... I'll come back, I'd rather ... I'll come back, I'll come back ...
(She runs out.)
 
SCÈNE VIII (SCENE VIII)
Don José, Cigarette Girls, Zuniga, Soldiers
 
DON JOSÉ
Yes, Mother, I'll do what you want ... I'll marry Micaëla, and as for that gipsy with her witch's flowers ...
 
Just as he is going to take out the flower from his tunic, there is a great uproar in the factory. Zuniga enters followed by soldiers.
 
ZUNIGA (spoken)
Now then, now then, what's going on?
 
The Cigarette Girls rush out half-undressed.
 
CHORUS OF CIGARETTE GIRLS
Come and help! Can't you hear the row?
Come and help! Separate them now.
FIRST GROUP OF WOMEN
Carmen's the one to blame!
SECOND GROUP OF WOMEN
No, no, it wasn't her fault!
FIRST GROUP
It was.
SECOND GROUP
It was not.
FIRST GROUP
It was, it was, she hit her!
She hit her first -- we're telling you!
ALL THE WOMEN
(surrounding the Lieutenant)
Don't listen to their lies, Señor, it isn't true!
It isn't true!
It isn't true!
SECOND GROUP
(pulling the officer to their side)
Manuelita had said
And she repeated it loudly,
She was going to buy a donkey,
Pedigree, and highly bred.
FIRST GROUP
(same business)
Carmencita down the room
Retorted as usual, rudely,
"Why d'you want to ride a donkey?
You'd look better on a broom!"
SECOND GROUP
Manelita replied,
"If you ever need a donkey
For a certain little journey,
He'll serve you for such a ride."
FIRST GROUP
"When they take you to the jail
You can ride there like a lady,
Two police behind the donkey,
Swatting flies upon your tail!"
ALL THE WOMEN
Thereupon each of the pair,
Grabbed a great handful of hair,
Grabbed the other by the hair!
ZUNIGA
(with humor)
To hell with them and their palaver!
(to Don José)
You there, José, just take a couple of men,
Go inside and find out who is causing the row there!
Don José takes two men with him and goes into the factory. Meanwhile the women struggle and argue.
 
FIRST GROUP OF WOMEN
Carmen's the one to blame!
SECOND GROUP OF WOMEN
No, no, it wasn't her fault!
etc.
ZUNIGA
(deafened -- to the soldiers)
Hi, you!
Get all of these women here out of my way!
ALL THE WOMEN
Señor, señor, don't listen to their lies!
It isn't true! It isn't true!
SOLDIERS
(They push the women back and separate them.)
Go on, get over there
And hold your tongue. Go on, get over there!
ALL THE WOMEN
It isn't true!
SOLDIERS
Get over there!
 
The Cigarette Girls slip between the soldiers who are trying to push them back. They rush at Zuniga and repeat their story.
 
FIRST GROUP OF WOMEN
Carmen's the one to blame!
etc.
SECOND GROUP OF WOMEN
Manuelita's the one to blame!
etc.
SOLDIERS
(They push the women back again.)
Go on, get over there
And hold your tongue. Go on, get over there!
The soldiers finally succeed in pushing the women back. They are kept at a distance around the square by a line of dragoons. Carmen appears at the factory entrance, led by Don José and two soldiers.
 

 SCÈNE IX (SCENE IX)
Les mêmes, Carmen (The same, Carmen)
"Eh bien, brigadier?"

Dialogue
 
ZUNIGA
Well, Corporal?
DON JOSÉ
I saw the Señorita ... with her knife.
ZUNIGA
Señorita Carmencita?
DON JOSÉ
Yes, Señor ...
On the word of a Basque.
ZUNIGA
(to Carmen)
Have you anything to say?
Speak. I'm waiting.
 
N. 8. Song and Melodrama
 
Instead of answering, Carmen begins to hum "Tra la la la la."
 
CARMEN (singing)
Tra la, la, la, la, la, la, la,
Though you beat me or burn me, I've nothing to say,
Tra la, la, la, la, la, la, la,
For I'll brave all your fire and your steel -- even heaven!
 
ZUNIGA (spoken)
It isn't songs that I'm asking for, but an answer.
 
CARMEN  (singing)
Tra la, la, la, la, la, la, la,
I've a secret to keep and I'll keep it my way!
Tra la, la, la, la, la, la, la,
There's another I love, though you kill me I'll love him.
ZUNIGA (spoken)
Aha! so that's the line we're taking!
(to Don José)
One thing's quite clear, isn't it, that there has been a knifing, and that she was the one who used the knife!
At this moment five or six women from the right succeed in breaking through the line of soldiers and rush to the center of the stage, shouting "Yes, yes! It was her!" Carmen goes to attack the woman closest to her; Don José prevents her. The soldiers drive off all the women and this time right off the stage. Some soldiers remain in sight, guarding access to the square.
 
 
ZUNIGA (to Carmen; spoken)
Hey! Hey! You're certainly free with your hands.
(to the soldiers)
Find me some rope!
A moment of silence. Carmen hums in the most impertinent manner as she watches Zuniga.
 
A SOLDIER (bringing a piece of rope)
The rope, Señor.
ZUNIGA  (to Don José; spoken)
Go and bind those two pretty hands.
Carmen, without the least resistance, smiles as she holds out her hands to Don José.
ZUNIGA
It really is a pity, because she's attractive! But attractive though you may be, you will go to prison all the same. You can sing your gipsy songs there, and the jailer will tell you what he thinks of them.
Carmen's hands are tied. She is made to sit on a bench in front of the guardhouse. She sits quite still, looking down.
 
ZUNIGA
I will go and write out the order.
(to Don José)
And you can take her.
(He goes out.)
 

 SCÈNE X (SCENE X)
Carmen, Don José (Carmen, Don José )

A moment's silence. Carmen raises her eyes and looks at Don José. He turns his back and walks off a few steps. Then he comes back toward Carmen, who watches him all the time.
 
Dialogue
 
CARMEN
Señor officer, this rope ... it's bruising my wrists.
DON JOSÉ
(approaching Carmen)
It it's hurting you, I can loosen it ...
(He unties the rope.)
 
CARMEN
Friend, won't you help a girl from your own country?
DON JOSÉ
You ... a Basque?
CARMEN
Of course!
DON JOSÉ
What nonsense ... Everything about you says gipsy ...
CARMEN
Yes, I'm  a gypsy. But you'll do what I ask all the same because you love me.
DON JOSÉ
Me!
CARMEN
Yes, you!
DON JOSÉ
That's enough, do you hear! I forbid you to speak to me!
CARMEN
Very well, Señor officer. You forbid me to speak, so I'll say nothing ...
(Carmen keeps her eyes fixed on Don José, who walks away, then gradually comes nearer.)
 
N. 9. Chanson et Duo (N. 9. Song and Duet)
"Prè des remparts de Seville"
CARMEN
Close by the walls of Sevilla,
Lives my old friend Lillas Pastia,
I'll go there to dance the Seguidille
And to drink Manzanilla,
I will go and visit Lillas Pastia!
Yes, but alone it's very boring!
Real pleasures are for two to share ...
So to provide amusement for me
I'll take my latest lover there ...
My latest love! ... No, that is over.
Last night I showed him to the door ...
My wounded heart wants consoling,
My heart is waiting free as air ..
Tho' I have dozens of admirers
I don't know any who will do;
And here we are, tomorrow's Sunday,
If I am loved ... I will love too.
Who wants my heart ... free for the taking ...
You have arrived at the right time,
I'll not stay any longer waiting,
With my new love I'll go along ...
Close by the walls of Sevilla,
Lives my old friend Lillas Pastia,
I'll go there to dance the Seguidille
And to drink Manzanilla,
Yes, on Sunday I will visit Lillas Pastia!
DON JOSÉ
Be quiet, you have been told you must not speak to me.
CARMEN
(innocently)
I didn't speak to you ... I sing for my own pleasure,
And I'm thinking ... It's surely not forbidden to think.
I think of a certain Dragoon,
Who loves me, whom in return,
Yes, in return, I well may learn to love!
DON JOSÉ
(moved)
Carmen!
CARMEN
But my Dragoon is no swaggering Captain,
Nor Lieutenant, oh no, he's only a Corporal;
But that's good enough for a gipsy girl,
I've decided to make do with him!
DON JOSÉ
(untying the rope around Carmen's hands)
Carmen, I am drunk when I hear you,
If I weaken, just to be near you,
Do you promise you will be true,
And if I love you Carmen, Carmen
you'll love me too ...
At Lillas Pastia's, you'll keep your word?
Carmen ... you'll keep your word ...
 
CARMEN
Yes, there we will dance the Seguidilla,
And we will drink Manzanilla,
Close by the walls of Sevilla,
With my old friend Lillas Pastia,
There we will dance the Seguiidilla
And we will drink Manzanilla.
Tra la la la la la la la la la la la.
 
DON JOSÉ
(spoken)
The Lieutenant! ... Take care!
Don José moves away from Carmen, who goes and sits on her bench again, her hands behind her back. Zuniga returns.

  SCÈNE XI (SCENE XI)

The same, the Lieutenant, then Workers, Soldiers and Townspeople.
ZUNIGA
(à Don José)
Here's the order, now go, and mind now how you guard her!
CARMEN
(aside to José)
On the way I'll give you a shove,
With the strength that I know I have
So that over you go ... the rest you leave to me.
She takes her place between two dragoons, José behind her. Meantime the women and townspeople gradualy return, kept at a distance by the dragoons. Carmen crosses the stage from left to right, toward the bridge.
 
CARMEN
(humming and laughing in Zuniga's face)
Oh love that was born to gipsy life,
A life that's free, that is as free as air;
You may not love me, yet I love you;
If I love you, then you take care!
When she arrives at the bridge, Carmen pushes José, who lets himself be pushed over. Confusion, chaos. Carmen escapes. When she reaches the center of the bridge, she stops for a moment and throws the rope over the parapet of the bridge before running off, while the Cigarette Girls surround Zuniga, roaring with laughter.
 

  END OF ACT I

ACT II

ACTE DEUXIEME (ACT TWO)
SCÈNE I (SCENE I)
Entr'acte

Carmen, Zuniga, Morales, officers and gypsies
 
Lillas Pastia's inn. Tables on the right and the left. Carmen, Mercedes, Frasquita, Lieutenants Zuniga, Andres and other officers. They have just finished dinner. The table is in disarray. The officers and the gypsies are smoking cigarettes. Two gypsies are playing guitars in a corner, while two gypsy girls are dancing in the middle of the stage. Carmen sits watching the gypsies dance; Zuniga is talking to her softly, but she is ignoring him. Suddenly she gets up and begins to sing.
 


No 11 Chanson: "Les tringles des sistres tintaient"
 

N. 11. Song

CARMEN
The triangles they used to play
Would set the gypsy rhythms tingling,
Till roused by their metallic jingling
The gypsy girls began to sway.
Their tambourines took up the theme,
While mad guitars in rhythm beating
Were unrelentingly repeating
This very song, this same refrain!
Tra la la la la la la.
 
The gypsies dance during the refrain. Mercedes and Frasquita join in the chorus with Carmen.
 
CARMEN
The copper and the silver rings
Would shine against the dusky faces;
The red and orange of their dresses
Would go swirling upon the wind;
And soon the dance was under way.
It started slowly with the singing,
Then gaining speed and wildly spinning,
It whirled away, away, away, away!
Tra la la la la la la.
 
MERCÉDÈS ET FRASQUITA
Tra la la la la la la.
CARMEN
The gypsy men with hands awhirl,
Beat out a rhythm mad, demonic,
Intoxicating with their music
Inflaming every gypsy girl!
And by the rhythm of the song,
Demented and with passion burning,
They were swept away, wildly spinning,
In a whirlwind borne along!
Tra la la la la la la.
ALL THREE
Tra la la la la la la.
The dance grows very fast and passionate. Carmen dances too and falls onto a bench breathless as the last notes of the orchestra die away. Lillas Pastia now begins to hover round the officers, rather embarrassed.

Dialogue
 

"Mon Dieu, messieurs, il commence à se faire tard"

PASTIA
My God, gentlemen, it's getting late ... and I'm bound to follow the regulations.
ZUNIGA
I know that very well. Come, let's spend an hour at the theater. (to the girls) Are you coming with us, girls?
Pastia motions to the girls to refuse.
MERCEDES
Oh, no!
ZUNIGA
But you, Carmen, you won't refuse ...
CARMEN
No!
ZUNIGA
Are you angry with me?
CARMEN
Why?
ZUNIGA
Because of the corporal who let you escape?
CARMEN
Well ...
ZUNIGA
He's been demoted ...
CARMEN
Reduced to the ranks?
ZUNIGA
Yes, and spent a month in prison.
CARMEN
But is he out now?
ZUNIGA
Only today!
CARMEN
That's all right then; he's free, he's free!
ZUNIGA
You're quickly consoled.
CARMEN
Pah!
 

No 12 Chúur et Ensemble: "Vivat! vivat le toréro!

N. 12. Chorus and Ensemble

CHORUS

Hurrah! Long live the Torero!
Hurrah! Long live Escamillo!
Oh never did Torero
With such unerring hand,
And a blow that was faier,
Fell the bull to the ground!
Hurrah! Long live the Torero!
Hurrah! Long live Escamillo!
ZUNIGA (spoken)
What's all that about?
MERCEDES (spoken)
A torchlight procession.
ZUNIGA (spoken)
And who are they cheering?
CHORUS
Oh never did Torero
With such unerring hand,
And a blow that was faier,
Fell the bull to the ground!
Hurrah! Long live the Torero!
Hurrah! Long live Escamillo! ...
FRASQUITA (spoken)
I know him ... it's Escamillo, the great Torero of Grenada who promises to become as renowned as Montes!
ZUNIGA (spoken)
I say! We must make him come in here .. and drink to him! (to an officer) Tell him to come in!
PASTIA (spoken; pleading)
Señores, please ... I have told you ...
ZUNIGA (spoken)
Have the goodness to leave us alone, Lillas Pastia, and bring us something to drink ...
The officer signals to Zuniga that the Torero has accepted the invitation.
ZUNIGA (spoken)
He's coming!
Enter Escamillo and his friends.
CHORUS
Hurrah! Long live the Torero!
Hurrah! Long live Escamillo!

SCÈNE II (SCENE II)

The above, Escamillo

No 13 Couplet: "Votre toast...je peux vous le rendre"

N. 13. Couplet

ESCAMILLO
I
To your toast, I now drink another,
Señor, señor, to this I have the right,
For we Toreros all are your brothers
Your real joy in life, like ours, is the fight.
The arena's full, the day a Fiesta.
The arena's full, they're herded tight:
The noisy crowd, past all restraining,
Lashing themselves to a frenzy yell with delight;
Rowdy taunting, with shouts and jeering,
Making passions hot and tempers rise!
Today's the day we prove our daring;
And the day that the brave will prize.
Come on, on guard. Ah! ...
(gaily; pleased with himself)
Toreador, on guard now,
Toreador, Toreador!
Do not forget that when you draw your word
Two dark eyes look down
And love is your reward.

Carmen fills Escamillo's glass.
 

No 13 bis Chúur: "Toréador, en garde"
 

II

All at once the crowd is silent:
The crowd is silent, whatever's happening?
More shouting! Here he comes! Look, the bull is free
And rusing out into the ring ...
In he bounds and then he charges, a horse goes rolling
With him goes a picador.
"Ah, Bravo toro!" bellow the people.
Off goes the bull, then turns ready to gore!
He tries to shake the banderillas off ...
And charges on enraged, the blood is flowing fast!
Off they run, try to climb the barriers!
Now it's your turn at last.
Come on, on guard. An!
(gaily; pleased with himself)
Toreador, on guard now,
Toreador, Toreador!
Do not forget that when you draw your sword
Two dark eyes look down
And love is your reward.

FRASQUITA, ESCAMILLO, MERCÉDÈS CARMEN (in turn)
Love!
ALL
Toreador, on guard now, etc.
Everyone drinks and shakes Escamillo's hand. The officers get ready to go. Escamillo is near Carmen.

Dialogue

"Dis-moi ton nom"

ESCAMILLO
Tell me your name, and the next time I kill a bull, yours will be the name I utter.
CARMEN
I'm called Carmencita.
ESCAMILLO
Carmencita?
CARMEN
Carmen or Carmencita, as you like.
ESCAMILLO
Well then, Carmen or Carmencita, if I took it into my head to love you and to want to be loved by you, what would your answer be?
CARMEN
I'd answer ... (she whispers)
ESCAMILLO
Ah!
CARMEN
That's how it is.
ESCAMILLO
Then I'll wait and content myself with hoping.
CARMEN
There's nothing against waiting, and it's always pleasant to hope.
PASTIA
Gentlemen, I beg you ...
ZUNIGA
Alright, alright, we're going. Listen, Carmen, I'll come back here in an hour.
CARMEN
Back here? ...
ZUNIGA
Yes, after roll call.
CARMEN
I don't advise you to come back.
ZUNIGA (laughing)
I'll come back all the same.
(loudly)
We're coming with you, torero.
ESCAMILLO
It's a great honor for me, sir.
CHORUS
Toreador, on guard, etc.
All exit except Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes and Lillas Pastia.

SCÈNE III (SCENE III)

Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes, Pastia, Dancairo, Remendado.
Dialogue
 

"Eh bien, les nouvelles?"

FRASQUITA
Well, what news?
DANCAIRO
Not too bad; we've come from Gibraltar ...
REMENDADO
Nice town, Gibraltar! you see the English there, lots of English; nice fellows, Englishmen - a bit cold, but distinguished.
DANCAIRO
Remendado!..
REMENDADO
Right, boss.
DANCAIRO
And you, my beauties, you're coming with us ...
FRASQUITA
What for?
MERCEDES 
To help you carry the bales?
REMENDADO
Oh! no ...
MERCEDES
No?
REMENDADO
Making women carry bales, that wouldn't be very nice.
DANCAIRO (threateningly)
Remendado?
REMENDADO
Right, boss.

N. 14. Quintette "Nous avons en tête une affaire"
 

DANCAIRO
We've a little plan, very clever!
FRASQUITA, MERCEDES
And one that it will pay to do?
DANCAIRO, REMENDADO
Never knew a better, no never;
But now we need some help from you.
ALL THREE WOMEN
From us?
BOTH MEN
From you!
For we most humbly beg to state, 
And most respectfully of course,
When you have dirty work in view,
Anything new,
Tricky to do,
Nothing is easier, we have found,
Given a few women around,
But without 
The beauty about,
We never seem to do
So well!
ALL THREE WOMEN
What, without us never
Do well?
BOTH MEN
With that we know you will agree?
ALL THREE WOMEN
You're right, with that
We quite agree.
AL FIVE
When you have dirty work in view,
Anything new,
Tricky to do,
Nothing is easier, we have found,
Given a few women around,
But without 
The beauty about,
We never seem to do
So well!
DANCAIRO
Agreed, and so you leave today.
FRASQUITA, MERCEDES
Just when you say.
REMENDADO
Now, right away.
CARMEN
Ah! If I may, let me say;
(to Mercedes and Frasquita)
If you want to be off - away!
But you won't find me in theparty.
I will not go ... I will not go!
DANCAIRO
Carmen, my darling, you must go.
You wouldn't surely have the heart
To stay and leave us in the cart!
FRASQUITA, MERCEDES
Ah! But Carmen, say you'll go!
CARMEN
I tell you no! I tell you no!
DANCAIRO
But at least tell us why, Carmen, you answer no!
THE OTHER FOUR
Tell us why, tell us why, tell us why, tell us why!
CARMEN
Oh yes, of course I'll tell you why;
THE OTHER FOUR
Go on, go on, go on, go on!
CARMEN
The reason is just now that I ...
THE OTHER FOUR
Well then, well then, well then, well then!
CARMEN
... find that I am in love ...!
BOTH MEN (astounded)
What did she say?
BOTH WOMEN
She said she finds herself in love!
BOTH MEN
She's in love!
BOTH WOMEN
She's in love!
CARMEN
Yes, I'm in love!
BOTH MEN
Good Lord, Carmen, try to be serious.
CARMEN
I'm in love, insanely in love.
BOTH MEN
Well we must say we are astonished,
But this won't be the only time
That you, my clever girl, have managed 
So as to bring your duty and love into line.
CARMEN (frankly)
My friends, I'm flattered you should choose me
To go along with you this time;
This evening, though, if you'll excuse me,
Love comes first, duty next, duty and love won't combine.
This evening, duty and love won't combine.
DANCAIRO
This cannot be your final word?
CARMEN 
Oh, yes it is!
REMENDADO
Be kind to us 
And change your mind, my dear.
ALL FOUR
You must be there, Carmen, you must be there!
For this affair
You must be there;
You know its' true ...
CARMEN 
Oh, as to that, I quite agree with you.
ALL FIVE
When you have dirty work in view,
Anything new,
Tricky to do,
Nothing is easier, we have found,
Given a few women around,
But without 
The beauty about,
We never seem to do
So well!

Dialogue
 

"Amoureuse...ce n'est pas une raison, cela" No 15 Chanson"Halte là! Qui va là? "Ecoutez, le voilà"

DANCAIRO
In love ... but that's not a reason!
REMENDADO
I'm in love too, but that doesn't stop me from making myself useful.
FRASQUITA
I've never seen you like this; but who are you waiting for?
MERCEDES
That soldier who was in prison?
CARMEN
Yes.
N. 15. Song
DON JOSÉ (from far away)
"Hey, hola!
Who goes there?"
"Friend from Alcala!"
"Where are you going there,
Friend from Alcala?"
"Off to do some fighting,
Till the foe is writhing,
And the dust he's biting."
"Well, if that's the case,
Soldier, you may pass.
When it's for a fight,
Or affair of the heart
We will never bar
Friends from Alcala!"
Dialogue
The music continues. Through the half-open shutters Carmen, Dancairo, Remendado, Mercedes and Frasquita watch Don José approach.
CARMEN
Listen, there he is!
MERCEDES
It's certainly a dragoon.
REMENDADO
And a handsome dragoon.
DANCAIRO (to Carmen)
Well, since you won't come till tomorrow, you should persuade your dragoon to come with you and join us.
CARMEN
Ah! It's no use thinking about it ... he's too naive.
DANCAIRO
Then why do you love him?
CARMEN
Because he's a handsome lad and he pleases me.
REMENDADO (foolishly)
The chief doesn't understand that it's enough to be a handsome lad...
DANCAIRO
Remendado!
REMENDADO
Right, boss.
Remendado runs off, Dancairo chases him, followed by Mercedes and Frasquita, who try to calm him.
Song
DON JOSÉ (his voice gradually approaching)
"Hey, hola!
Who goes there?"
"Friend from Alcala!"
"Where are you going there,
Friend from Alcala?"
"Punctual you see me,
Faithful to my duty,
At the call of beauty!"
"Well, if that's the case,
Soldier, you may pass.
When it's for a fight,
Or affair of the heart
We will never bar
Friends from Alcala!"
(Don José enters.)

SCÈNE IV (SCENE IV)

Don José, Carmen
Dialogue

CARMEN

Here you are at last .. It's about time.
DON JOSÉ
It's only two hours since I let prison.
CARMEN
Who stopped you leaving sooner? I sent you a file and a gold coin.
DON JOSÉ
But what then? I still have my honor as a soldier. (He holds out the gold coin to her.) There you are!
CARMEN
I'll be damned! He kept it! ... Hola! Lillas Pastia, hey there! We'll eat everything ... we'll have a feast ... Here, catch! ... Bring us something (throwing him the coin) of all you have, everything ...
DON JOSÉ
Carmen, I love you, 
I adore you.
Lillas Pastia returns carrying a dish of oranges, sweets, preserves, fruits, manzanilla.
CARMEN
Put all that down here ... now get out ... Let's eat everything, everything!
She has sat down. Don José sits down facing her.
DON JOSÉ
You gobble sweets like a six-year-old!
CARMEN
Your lieutenant was here just before; he made me do a gypsy dance ...
DON JOSÉ
You danced?
CARMEN
Yes!
DON JOSÉ
Carmen! ...
CARMEN
What's the matter? Are you jealous?
DON JOSÉ
Of course I'm jealous.
CARMEN
Come, don't be angry ... If you like, I'll dance for you now, for you alone.
DON JOSÉ
If I like - of course I'd like ...
CARMEN
Where are my castanets? ... What did I do with my castanets? (laughing) Did you take them?
DON JOSÉ
No, no!
CARMEN (tenderly)
Yes, yes! ... I'm sure it was you ... Ah! There are some castanets ... (She breaks a plate, makes a pair of castanets from two pieces of china, and tries them)
That's no good ...
Where are they, then?
Ah, there they are.
DON JOSÉ
Oh Carmen, how I love you, how I love you!
CARMEN 
I hope so, indeed.

N. 16. Duet
 

No 16 "Je vais danser en votre honneur"

CARMEN (with comic solemnity)
Now I will dance only for you,
And you will see, my lord ...
How I can make the music I need for my dancing.
So take your seat, Don José. We are starting!
La la la la ...
She makes Don José sit down. Dancing and humming, she accompanies herself on the castanets. Don José watches her, entranced. Soon in the distance the sound of bugles is heard. Don José listens. He thinks he might have heard the bugles, but Carmen's castanets click so loudly that he is not sure. Don José goes up to Carmen and takes her by the arms, forcing her to stop.
DON JOSÉ
Please, will you stop, Carmen, please, will you stopa a moment.
CARMEN (astonished)
And what for, may I ask?
DON JOSÉ
I am certain, out there ...
Yes, there goes the retreat, I hear our bugles calling ...
Can you not hear them too?
CARMEN (happily)
Bravo! I've tried my hardest, but nothing's more depressing
Than to dance witout music ... Hurrah then for the music
That has dropped from the blue!
La la la la ...
She begins to sing again in rhythm with the bugles off-stage ... She returns to her dance and Don José to watching her. The sound of the bugles comes nearer ... nearer ... passing under the windows of the inn ... Then moves away, becoming fainter and fainter. Don José again tries to tear himself away from Carmen ... He takes her by the arms and forces her to stop once more.
DON JOSÉ
But you don't understand, Carmen ...
Retreat is sounding!
I must be there for roll call in barracks tonight!
(The sound of the bugles stops suddenly.)
CARMEN (stupefied and looking at Don José, who is putting on his pouch and belt)
Back to barracks! For the night!
(exploding)
Ah! How could I be so stupid!
I tore myself to pieces, no matter what it cost,
To entertain señor! And I sang! And I danced!
I thought, Heaven forgive me,
I was almost in love!
Ta ra ta ta... my God, there go the bugles!
He's off, he's taken fright!
Off you fly, you canary!
(furiously throwing his cap at him)
Here! take your old cap, your sabre and your pouch too,
And get out them, my lad, go on back to your quarters!
DON JOSÉ (sadly)
It's wrong of you, Carmen, to treat me like a fool!
I do not want to go, for up till now no woman,
till I set eyes on you,
No woman yet, till I set eyes on you,
Had ever touched my ehart and made me care so deeply!
CARMEN (mimicking Don José's passionate tone)
He does not want to go, for up till now no woman,
Till he set eyes on me,
No woman yet, till he set eyes on me,
Had ever touched his heart and made him care so deeply.
Ta ra ta ta... "My God, there go the bugles!
I am sure I shall be late!" And then he panics! He flies!
There you are! There's his love!
DON JOSÉ
And so you don't believe
That I'm in love?
CARMEN
Oh no!
DON JOSÉ
Alright, now you shall hear.
CARMEN 
But I don't want to hear you ...
You are keeping them waiting.
DON JOSÉ
Hear me you shall! That's enough!
Carmen listen to me!

With his left hand, he seizes Carmen sharply by the arm, with his right hand he feels inside his tunic for the flower that Carmen threw him in Act I. He shows her the flower.
 

"La fleur que tu m'avais jetée"

I

Here is the flower that you threw me,
While in the jail it never left me,
Though dry and faded, yet the flower
Has kept its scent, its magic power;
In my cell for whole hours together,
I would close my eyes and remember,
Until the scent set me on fire,
And in that night I'd see you there!

II

Then I would curse the hour I met you,
And, trying to hate and forget you
I'd even say: oh why did fate
Ever decree we two should meet!
Then my heart would tell me I wronged you,
And my only thought was to find you,
All that remained was one desire,
Let me find you, Carmen, see you again!
For you had only to appear there,
Your dark eyes but to glance my way,
And you possessed me then forever,
O my Carmen! You have enslaved me from that hour!
Carmen, I love you!

"Non, tu ne m'aimes pas!"

CARMEN 
No! You are not in love!

DON JOSÉ
What d'you say?
CARMEN 
No! You are not in love! No! No! If it were true,
Out there, with me, you'd follow too!
DON JOSÉ
Carmen!
CARMEN
Yes! into the hills where none would find you!
DON JOSÉ
Carmen!
CARMEN 
Into the hills we both would ride!
Galloping through the countryside,
You on your horse with me so close behind you,
Carried off, like a gipsy bride!
DON JOSÉ (troubled)
Carmen! Carmen!
CARMEN 
Into the hills where none would find you!
Into the hills we both would ride!
We both would ride - were you in love!
Up there you need answer to no one;
No orders there, no Captain you need to obey,
Up there no retreat will be sounded,
Roughly remnding lovers to be on their way!
Sky up above, and open spaces,
For one's home all the world, and for law each goes his way!
Best of all, like wine to the senses,
The life that's free! The life that's free!
DON JOSÉ
Oh God! Carmen! Be quiet!
CARMEN 
Into the hills, were you in love,
Into the hills we both would ride!
Into the hills we both would ride!
Galloping through the countryside,
You on your horse with me so close behind you,
Just like a gypsy bride, were you in love!
DON JOSÉ
Carmen! Enough, enough! Be quiet! My God!
Carmen have pity!
Oh my God! Spare me!
Ah no more I say!
CARMEN
Don't you agree,
Into the hills you'll come with me,
You love me, so you'll come with me.
Into the hills take me away!
DON JOSÉ  (violently tearing himself away from Carmen's embrace)
No! I will not hear any more!
To leave the Dragoons ... and desert ...
That's dishonor ... and degradation!
No, I refuse!
CARMEN (harshly)
Alright! Go!
DON JOSÉ (begging her)
Carmen, I impore you ...
CARMEN 
No! My love for you is gone! Go! I detest you!
DON JOSÉ
Listen! Carmen!
CARMEN
Goodbye! Don't come near me again.
DON JOSÉ (wretchedly)
Alright then, goodbye! Goodbye! And forever!
CARMEN 
Get out! ... Goodbye!
DON JOSÉ
Carmen! Farewell! Farewell evermore!
CARMEN 
Goodbye!
He turns toward the door .. There is a knock ... Don José stops. Silence. Another knock.

SCÈNE V (SCENE V)

The above, Zuniga
 

No 17 Finale: "Holà! Carmen!"

ZUNIGA
Hey there, Carmen! Hey there!
DON JOSÉ
Who's knocking? Who's there?
CARMEN 
Ssh!
ZUNIGA (forcing open the door)
I'll open the door myself and come in.
(sees Don José; to Carmen)
Ah, shame on you, my beauty.
Your choice is not a happy one: it's beneath you to take a private when you have an officer. 
(to Don José)
Get out!
DON JOSÉ (calm but resolute)
No.
ZUNIGA
On your way, I say.
DON JOSÉ
I won't go.
ZUNIGA (striking him)
Rascal!
DON JOSÉ (leaping to his sword)
By God! You're asking for trouble.
(Zuniga begins to draw his sabre.)
CARMEN (throwing herself between them)
You jealous fool!
(calling)
Help! Help!
Dancairo, Remendado, Mercedes, Frasquita, and the gypsies appear from all sides. Carmen indicates Zuniga to the gypsies with a sign; Danciro and Remendado run to him, disarming him.
CARMEN (in a mocking voice to Zuniga)
My fine Señor, it's true
I fear, that love has played a nasty trick on you!
You choose a tactless time
At which to reappear! And so, you force us, we're afraid,
Since we don't want to be betrayed,
To order you at least ... an hour's detention.
DANCAIRO AND REMENDADO
(pistols in hand, politely to Zuniga)
My dear sir, we're about to leave this house; please come with us ...
 
CARMEN
It's for a walk.
DANCAIRO AND REMENDADO
Do you consent?
Answer, friend!
ZUNIGA 
Certainly.
All the more since your argument 
is one of those hardly to be resisted ...
(changing his tone, to Don José)
But beware, later!
DANCAIRO (philosophically)
War is war.
Meanwhile, sir, walk ahead
without our having to urge you.
REMENDADO, CHORUS
Walk ahead without our having to urge you.
(Zuniga is led out at pistol point by four gypsies.)
CARMEN (to Don José)
Are you one of us now?
DON JOSÉ
I have to be!
CARMEN
Ah! That wasn't very gallantly put,
but no matter. You'll get used
to it when you see how fine
is the wandering life, the 
wide world your country, your wish the law,
and above all
the intoxication of liberty, liberty!
ALL (to Don José)
Come with us across the countryside,
come with us into the mountains;
you'll get used to it when you see
how fine is the wandering life, the wide world your country,
your wish the law, and above all the intoxication of liberty, liberty!
The open sky, the wide world your country.


 

ACTE III (ACT III)
 
SCÈNE I (SCENE I)
 
Entr'acte

English
 

Carmen, Don José, Dancairo, Remendado, Frasquita, Mercedes, Smugglers
 
No 18 Introduction: "Écoute, compagnon, écoute...Notre metier est bon"
The curtain rises on rocks ... A picturesque and wild spot ... completely deserted. Dark night. After a few moments, a smuggler appears above on the rocks, then another, and another. Smugglers appear here and there, climbing down the rocks. The men are carrying large bales on their shoulders.
Les Contrebandiers
Be careful, be careful, do not let them hear you,
Fortune's waiting, waiting down below,
One mistake now, and we are done for,
And so be careful how you go!
Frasquita, Mercedes, Carmen, Don José, Remendado, Dancairo
Our kind of life can bring a fair reward,
To follow it you need to have
The courage that will dare, though!
Danger is there, you'll find it all around,
It's down below, it's up above,
It's everywhere, who cares though!
On we go straight ahead, unafraid of the flood,
Unafraid of the storm,
Unafraid of the danger,
Unafraid of the soldier who's waiting below,
And we'll challenge the stranger!
Unafraid we go on straight ahead!
All
Be careful, be careful, do not let them hear you,
Fortune's waiting, waiting down below,
One mistake now, and we are done for,
And so be careful how you go!
 
SCÈNE II (SCENE II)
The same, except for Dancairo and Remendado
Dialogue
 
During the following scene, some of the gypsies light a fire, near which Mercedes and Frasquita come and sit; the rest roll themselves up in their cloaks, lie down and sleep.
 
"Voyons, Carmen...faisons la paix"
Don José
Come on, Carmen, let's make peace. Don't you love me any longer?
Carmen
No, what I want is to be free and to do what I like.
Don José
Are you a devil, Carmen?
Carmen
Yes ... What are you looking at?
Don José
Down there is a village, and in that village a dear old lady ...
Carmen (laughing)
A dear old lady?
Don José
Yes, my mother.
Carmen
Your mother ...
Don José
Carmen ... if you say again ...
Carmen
You'll kill me?
Don José
Youre a devil, Carmen.
Carmen
Of course! I told you so ...
She turns her back on Don José and goes to sit next to Mercedes and Frasquita. After a moment's indecision, Don José moves away and stretches out on the rocks. During the last part of the scene, Mercedes and Frasquita have spread out the cards in front of them.
 
No 19 Trio: Mêlons! Coupons!"
Frasquita
Shuffle!
Mercedes
Cut!
Frasquita
Right! There we are!
Mercedes
Three cards in a row ...
Frasquita
Four there!
Frasquita, Mercedes
So there we are; now say, my beauties,
Say what's to be, come tell us of the future.
Say who you know will let us down!
Say who you know will be our own!
Reply, reply, reply, reply!
Mercedes
There I see a lover who's bold,
He's young and we shan't have a carriage.
Frasquita
Well, mine's very rich and he's old;
All the same, he's talking of marriage!
Mercedes (proudly)
I am riding there on his horse
And off to the hills he will sweep me!
Frasquita
I live in a castle of course,
And there like a queen he will keep me!
Mercedes
I'll have love, and love without end,
Every day a riot of pleasure!
Frasquita (joyfully)
More gold than I know how to spend,
Jewelry, pearls, diamonds, treasure!
Mercedes
My lover is soon made a chief,
He's followed by hundreds of fine men!
Frasquita
And mine... and mine... oh! it's past all belief ...
(wildly)
Yes he dies! Ah! All his wealth will be mine then!
Frasquita, Mercedes
Come say once more, now say my beauties,
Say what's to be, come tell us of the future.
Say who you know will let us down!
Say who you know will be our own!
(They start to look at the cards again.)
Frasquita
A fortune!
Mercedes
Mine's love!
Since the beginning of the scene, Carmen has been watching Mercedes and Frasquita play.
 
"Carreau, pique...la mort!...En vain, pour éviter les réponses amères"
Carmen
Let's see - it is my turn to try.
(She begins to turn up the cards)
Diamond! Spade! It's death!
I can see ... I'm the first.
(pointing to the sleeping Don José)
Then I see him ... there for us both, it's death!
(in a low voice, shuffling the cards)
You never can escape their unrelenting answer,
However hard you try!
You only waste your time, because the cards are honest
And will not tell a lie!
If in the book of fate your happiness is written,
then deal and have no fear,
For every card you turn, to look into your future,
Will show good fortune there.
But if you are to die, the terrifying sentence
Is written there on high,
Though you deal twenty times ... the cards will show no mercy -
They still repeat: "You die!"
(turning the cards again)
And there ... and there ... each time: "You die!"
 
"Parlez encore, parlez, mes belles"
Frasquita, Mercédès
So there we are; now say, my beauties,
Say what's to be, come tell us of the future.
Say who you know will let us down!
Say who you know will be our own!
Reply, reply!
Carmen
You die! You die! There's no escape!
You die! You die! Again you die!
Each time: you die! Again! Again!
Dancairo and Remendado re-enter.
 
SCÈNE III (SCENE III)
Carmen, Don José, Frasquita, Mercedes, Dancairo, Remendado
Dialogue
 
"Holà, les belles!"
Danciaro
Hey there, my beauties!
Carmen
Well?
Danciaro
We've spotted three customs officers guarding the gap, and guarding it well, I assure you ...
Carmen
Do you know their names?
Remendado
Of course we know their names: there were Eusebio, Perez and Bartolomé ...
Frasquita
Eusebio...
Mercedes
Perez...
Carmen
And Bartolomé... (laughing) Don't worry, Dancairo, we'll take care of your three customs men ...
Don José (furiously)
Carmen!
Danciaro
Oh, you, give us a rest from your jealousy ... Off you go, children ... 
(They take up their bales.  He turns to Don José)
I'm entrusting to you the guard over the stuff we're leaving here. Place yourself there, and if you see anyone ... fire! Come on then!
 
No 20 Morceau d' Ensemble: Quant au douanier, c'est notre affaire"
Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes
Leave our three guards for us to deal with!
They're only human and love to please,
With ladies they love to be gallant;
So you let us go on in front!
Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes, Chorus of Gypsies
Leave our three guards for us to deal with!
So you let us go on in front!
Carmen
My young guard will be so blind!
Mercedes
My young guard will be so fond!
Frasquita
Oh yes, the guard will do anything we want!
Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes, and the Men
Leave our three guards for us to deal with!
They're only human and love to please,
With ladies they love to be gallant;
So you let us go on in front!
Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes
No need to fight if we are clever;
It only means having his arm
Around our waist - getting together
While he enjoys using his charm.

If it's a smile that he is after,
Oh well, why not: he'll have that too!

Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes, Chorus of Gypsies
And already we can assure you,
Our contraband all will get through.
Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes, Chorus
Come along! Get on! Come along!
Leave our three guards for us to deal with!
All exit. Micaela enters.

SCÈNE IV-V (SCENES IV-V )
 

Micaela
 
No 21 Air: "Je dis que rien ne m'épouvante"
Micaëla

I

I said there was nothing could scare me,
I said I'd stay here all alone tonight;
But though I try to act so bravely,
Yet in my heart I die of fright!
Here on this dreadful mountain
I'm alone and afraid, but wrong to be afraid!
You'll give me courage and protection,
For you are by my side, O Lord!
 

II

I shall meet that creature at last
Whose wicked cunning I can see,
Led astray to crime and dishonor
That man who means the world to me!
A dangerous woman and a beauty!
Yet I will never be afraid!
I'll tell her the truth when I face her,
Ah! For you are there protecting me ...

I said there was nothing could scare me, etc.
 

She disappears behind the bales. At the same time, Escamillo enters holding his hat in his hand.
 
SCÈNE IV (SCENE IV)
Escamillo, then Don José
Don José (his knife in his hand)
Who goes there? Reply!
 
"Qui va là?" No 22 Duo: "Je suis Escamillo"
Escamillo
I am Escamillo, torero of Granada.
Don José
Escamillo!
Escamillo
The same.
Don José (putting his knife back in his belt)
I know your name; 
welcome, but in truth, my friend, 
you should have stayed there.
Escamillo
My impression was the same.
But I'm in love, my friend, yes, quite insanely!
And surely he would prove unworthy of his flame,
Who would not risk his life to go and see his lady!
Don José
Then you're coming to find her up here?
Escamillo
That's the game -
A lovely gypsy girl, my friend.
Don José
What is her name?
Escamillo
Carmen.
Don José
Carmen!
Escamillo
Carmen, yes, my friend. Her lover used to be
A soldier who for love of her had turned deserter.
Don José (aside)
Carmen!
Escamillo
Oh, how they loved! It's over now, I hear,
Love affairs with Carmen last barely half a year.
Don José
Yet you love her, you say ...
Escamillo
I love her.
Yes, my friend, adore her, adore her quite insanely.
Don José
But if stealing our gypsy girls is what you're after,
You understand you have to pay? ...
Escamillo (cheerfully)
Right! Then I'll pay.
Don José (menacingly)
The price you have to pay is paid with a dagger!
Escamillo (surprised)
Is paid with a dagger?
Don José
You understand?
Escamillo
The idea's very clear!
This ex-Dragon, this soldier that she loves so,
Or rather, used to love, must be you?
Don José
Yes, I'm the soldier!
Escamillo
Delighted, my dear friend! So I take your place with her.
They take up positions a certain distance apart.
Escamillo
I know the guard you use, the Navarraise;
That, I warn you now as a friend,
Won't be any help ...
(Don José, without replying, sets upon the Torero.)
Take it easy!
I wanted to be sure you were warned.
(They fight. Escamillo, very calm, merely defends himself.)
Don José
You're not fighting, you cheat.
Escamillo
At any game of knives,
I'm far too sharp for you.
Don José
That we shall see!
A very fast and lively hand-to-hand fight. Don José is at the mercy of the Torero, who does not strike him.
Escamillo
There you are!
Your life rests with me, but the truth is
My proper trade is to strike down the bull,
And not to butcher fellow humans!
They start fighting again. Escamillo slips and falls on the grass. Don José is about to strike him. Carmen and Dancairo rush in.
 
No 23 Finale: Holà, holà, José!
Carmen
(grabbing Don José's arm)
Hola, José! ...
(Remendado, Mercedes, Frasquita, and the smugglers return during this time.)
Escamillo (getting up)
Ah! What pleasure it gives me
That it was you, Carmen, who came in time to save me.
Carmen
Escamillo!
Escamillo (to Don José)
As for you, soldier boy,
The game's not yet decided, we'll fight to win the lady:
So when you want to try again, you name the day.
Dancairo (intervening)
Alright! Alright! Leave it till later,
Come, for we must be off.
(to Escamillo)
And you, my friend, goodnight!
Escamillo
Before I go, at least you'll concede me the right
To invite you, one and all, to see me in Sevilla,
For there I am intending to shine at the fight,
(looking at Carmen)
Those who love me will come.
(coldly to Don José, who made a threatening gesture)
My friend, don't get excited!
(to Carmen)
That is all, all I've to say, ... yes I've no
more to do except bid you goodnight.
Don José turns to attack Escamillo, but Danciaro and Remendado hold him back. Escamillo goes off very slowly.
Don José (to Carmen, menacingly, but suppressed)
Better take care, Carmen, I won't stand any more ...
(Carmen replies to Don José with a shrug of her shoulders and moves away.)
Dancairo
We're starting, we're starting ... it's time to go ...
Chorus
We're starting, we're starting ... it's time to go ...
Carmen
Stop! Look, there is someone there, trying to hide!
(Micaela is brought in.)
Carmen
A woman!
Dancairo
Well, that's a pleasant surprise!
Don José (recognizing Micaela)
Micaela!
Micaela
Don José!
Don José
You're in danger!
Whatever brings you here?
 
Moi? Je viens te chercher
Micaela
Me? I came here for you ...
Down there, nearly despairing,
She is waiting at home,
All alone there your mother
Prays in tears for you, her son!
Through her tears she prays you'll hear her,
Calls and holds out her arms for you!
Oh, come home and be near her,
José, come home to her, oh do!
Carmen (to Don José, hammering it out)
Go on, go on, it's better so,
Our sort of life's no good to you.
Don José (to Carmen)
Do you tell me to follow her?
Carmen
Yes, you should go!
Don José
You tell me to follow her ...
So that you can then run away
To that other man you want.
No! No: I won't -
(resolutely)
For me death before I leave you!
No, Carmen, I'll never go, not I!
For our lives are bound together,
Bound together, till we die!
Micaela
Don José, it's your mother
Who entreats you not to stay,
And what binds your lives together,
José, you must break today!
Chorus
It is death unless you leave her.
José! You must go away,
And what binds your lives together,
You must break or you will die.
Don José (to Micaëla)
Let me be! For I know I am damned!
Chorus
José! Be careful!
Don José (to Carmen)
You are mine, daughter of Satan!
I will make you yield again
To the destiny that made us
That welded your fate to mine!
For me death before I leave you,
No, Carmen, I'll never go, not I!
Frasquita, Mercedes, Remendado, Dancairo, Choeur
Ah! Be careful! Be careful, Don José!
Micaela (with authority)
I've one more word to say and I won't speak again.
Your mother is ill! She's ill and she's dying!
And your mother would never want to die without pardoning you!
Don José
My mother! ... She'e going to die! ...
Micaela
Yes, Don José!
Don José
Let's go!
(to Carmen)
Rest assured ... I'm going, but we'll meet again!
(He leads Micaela off.)
Escamillo (off stage from far away)
Toreador, on guard now!
Toreador! Toreador!
Do not forget that, when you draw your sword,
Two dark eyes look down,
And love is your reward.
Don José stops upstage among the rocks. Watching Carmen, who is listening, he hesitates, then after a moment:
Don José
Micaela, let's go!
Carmen leans, listening, on the rocks. The gypsies have taken up their bales and start off.
END OF ACT III

ACTE QUATRIEME (ACT IV)

A square in Seville. At the back of the stage, the walls of the old arenas. The entrance to the bullring is closed by a long canvass curtain. It is the day of the bull-fight. The square is very busy. Water-sellers, orange-sellers, fan-sellers, etc.

SCÈNE I (SCENE I)

Zuniga, Andrès, Frasquita, Mercédés, etc., then Carmen and Escamillo

24. Choeur (24. Chorus)

Chorus
Two pesetas!
Two pesetas!
Fans here for you to fan yourselves!
Oranges to refresh yourselves!
Buy a program! Read all the names!
Good wine! Water! Best cigarettes!
Two pesetas!
Two pesetas!
All at two pesetas,
Señoras and Caballeros!
During the first chorus, Zuniga and another officer, with Frasquita and Mercedes on their arms, have entered.
A Soldier
Bring some oranges, quickly ...
Some Orange Sellers
Here you are --
Please take your choice now, Señoritas.
An Orange Seller
You're kind, my good Señor, many thanks!
Other Orange Sellers
Look at these, Señor, they're much sweeter!
Fan Sellers
Fans here for you to fan yourselves!
Orange Sellers
Oranges to refresh yourselves!
Program Seller
Buy a program, read all the names!
Wine Wellers
Wine!
Water Sellers
Water!
Cigarette Sellers
Cigarettes.
An Officer
Hey you! I want a fan!
Gypsy
Would señor be needing some glasses?

25. Choeur et Scène (25. Chorus and Scene)

Shouts are heard offstage, fanfares, etc. It is the arrival of the Cuadrilla.
Chorus
Here they are, here come the Cuadrilla,
The Cuadrilla of the Toreros!
How the lances shine in the sunlight!
Now up, up go your sombreros!
Here they are, here come the Cuadrilla,
The Cuadrlla of the Toreros!
(Procession of the Cuadrilla. The Policemen - the Alguazils - enter.)
Marching in and ready to chase us,
Here they come to push us about,
Policemen with their ugly faces.
Get out! Get out! Get out! Get out!
(The Chulos and Banderilleros enter.)
As they're marching by let us cheer them.
Give a cheer for the brave Chulos!
Bravo! Bravo! How we admire them!
There they go, the brave Chulos!
Look there the Banderilleros,
And oh! how arrogant their bearing!
What haughty looks! And how the sun picks out
The gold-embroidered silk they're wearing
Upon their costumes for the fight!
There go the Banderilleros!
(The Picadors enter.)
And here is another Cuadrilla.
Look there, the Picadors! They look so grand!
They will goad the bull with their lances
Till the blood is staining the sand!
The Torero! The Torero!
Escamillo! Escamillo!
(Escamillo finally appears and with him Carmen, radiant and stunningly dressed.)
Escamillo, blade of Granada,
Toreador, best of them all
He's the one who will end the drama,
He will strike and the bull will fall!
Long live our Escamillo!
Escamillo! bravo!

"Si tu m'aimes, Carmen"

Escamillo
If you love me, Carmen, you will find, very shortly
You can be proud of me.
Carmen
I love you, Escamillo, I love you, and may death take me,
If I have ever loved any man more than you!
Sound of trumpets offstage. Two trumpeters enter, followed by four policemen.
Several Voices
Way there!
Way there!
Way for His Worship the Mayor!
Chorus (lining up to watch the mayor's procession)
Don't be such a nuisance!
Let us take a look
As he marches by,
At our worthy Lord Mayor!

"Carmen, un bon consei"

A little march is played in the orchestra. The Mayor crosses the stage slowly, preceded and followed by policemen. Meanwhile, Frasquita and Mercedes go up to Carmen.
Frasquita
Carmen, take my advice, you'd better not stay here.
Carmen
And why not, may I ask?
Mercedes
He is here.
Carmen
But who?
Mercedes
He!
Don José ... Can't you see, in the crowd there, he's hiding ...
Carmen
Yes, I can see.
Frasquita
Be careful!
Carmen
I am not the sort to be frightened by him,
I have stayed, since I have something to say.
Mercedes
Carmen, believe me, be careful!
Carmen
I'm not afraid!
Frasquita
Be careful!
The mayor and the policemen enter the bullring. Behind the mayor's procession, the Cuadrilla procession begins to move again into the bullring. The crowd follows ... The orchestra plays the motif  "Here they are, here come the Cuadrilla," and the crowd withdraws to reveal Don José. Carmen remains alone, as she planned. The two watch while the crowd dissipates and the march motive diminishes in the orchestra. On the last notes, Carmen and Don José are alone facing one another.

SCÈNE II (SCENE II)

Carmen, Don José

N. 26. Duet, Finale (N. 26. Duet, Finale)

Carmen (curtly)
It's you!
Don José
It's me!
Carmen
They came just now to warn me
That you were not far off, that you were sure to stay;
And they told me my life itself might be in danger;
But I am brave! And I shall not run away!
Don José
I offer you no threat! I beg you, I implore you!
All that has passed, Carmen, is forgotten!
Yes, we'll begin again
Start our life again together
Far from here, away from Spain.
Carmen
What you ask can never happen!
Carmen never yet has lied!
Her mind is made up completely,
For her and you ... it's the end.
To you I've never lied! For us both it's the end.
Don José
Carmen, you have your life before you,
O my Carmen, oh, let me save you,
Save you, for I adore you,
Then you will have saved me, too!
Carmen
No, for I know it is time now,
And I know I'm going to die;
but if I live or if you kill me,
I'll not give in to you, not I.
Don José
Carmen, you have your life before you,
O my Carmen, oh let me save you,
Save you, for I adore you,
Then you will have saved me too!
Carmen
But why waste your time adoring
Someone who's no longer free?
No use your saying: "I adore you!"
You will get no more from me.
You waste your time,
I'll give in no more,
Not to you!
Don José (in anguish)
Then you don't love me at all?
(Carmen does not answer, so Don José repeats, in despair:)
Then you don't love me at all!
Carmen (calmly)
No, I don't love you at all.
Don José (passionately)
But I still love you, more than ever,
Carmen! I tell you I adore you!
Carmen
Oh what's the good of that? A lot of useless words!
Don José
Carmen, I tell you I adore you,
Alright, if that is what you want,
I'll stay a bandit here, and I'll do all you ask ...
All, do you hear, but don't desert me now,
O my Carmen! Ah! Do recall,
You must recall the past, how much in love we both were!
You cannot leave me now, Carmen!
You cannot leave me now!
Carmen
Carmen will never give way!
Free she was born, and free she will die!
Chorus and Fanfare
Bravo! What a fight to remember!
Dripping blood on the sand
See, the bull they have goaded
Returns back to the charge ...
Viva! Bravo! Oh Bravo!
Oh bravo, Torero, oh bravo, Torero!
Both Carmen and José listen to the cheering in silence. Carmen, when she hears the final shouts herself, lets out a cry of "Ah!" in pride and joy. Don José does not once take his eyes off her. As the chorus finishes, Carmen moves toward the bullring.
Don José (barring her way)
Where are you going?...
Carmen
Let me pass!
Don José
This fellow they are cheering,
Is then your latest love!
Carmen (trying to get past)
Let me pass, let me pass!
Don José
On my soul,
I'll ever let you pass, Carmen,
I'll make you follow me!
Carmen
Let me pass, Don José, I'll never go with you.
Don José
You mean to go to him! Speak!
(furiously)
It's him you love?
Carmen
I love him,
I love him, and in face of death
I repeat again that I love him.
Fanfare and Repirse of the Chorus (in the bullring)
Bravo, bravo! Victory!
Cut him clean to the heart!
Down goes the toro! Glory
To the victorious Toreador!
Victory!
Don José (violently)
And so, every hope of salvation
Now I shall have lost, all for you.
For you to go running, you harlot,
Into his arms, laughing at me.
No, by the saints, you'll not do that,
Carmen, for you're coming with me.
Carmen
No! No! Never!
Don José
I am tired of using threats!
Carmen (furiously)
All right, kill me at once, or let me go inside.
Chorus
Victory! Victory!
Don José (out of his mind)
Now for the last time, you fiend,
Will you come with me?
Carmen
No! No!
(half-voice, with rage)
You remember this ring - the ring that once you gave me ...
Take it!
(throws it at him)
Don José (drawing his knife, moves in on Carmen)
Well, then! Be damned!
(Carmen retreats ... Don José pursues her ... Fanfares and shouts in the arena.)
Chorus
Toreador, on guard now!
Do not forget that when you draw your sword,
Two dark eyes look down,
And love is your reward.
(José has stabbed Carmen ... She falls dead. José kneels beside her ... The curtain to the arena opens. The crowd comes out of the bullring.)
Don José (rising)
You can take me away ... I am the one who killed her.
(Escamillo appears on the steps of bullring surrounded by the crowd, who cheers him. Among the crowd are Frasquita, Mercédès, and Zuniga. Escamillo sees Carmen lying on the ground, dead.)
Ah! Carmen! My Carmen ... I adore you!
Curtain

  Fin de l'Opéra (End of the opera )